Tag Archives: Conservation Education

Getting an Education

It’s been a while since my last post. I seem to be needing time to settle into this year and all it has held for me already.

I have been quite overwhelmed by the whole Kikki K Dream Life experience so far. There has been something so comforting in having those three big dreams on paper in the Dream Tin perched on the Vision Wall. They are there with their respective Master Action Lists attached, goals and milestones in the diary…. everything my organised mind could wish for.

And then… serendipity! Two things have popped up this month most definitely not on any Master Action List. But two things which beautifully match where I am at with working towards all three of those dreams coming true…. the Universe in perfect alignment with my Dream Life!!

So, while there is something delicious in the structure of this particular dreaming process, and having dreams written down, and to do lists in place, there is something equally intriguing about being open to boundless possibility too.

One of these serendipitous events has been enrolling in two different online courses.

Exploring Conservation – free courses through National Geographic. Nothing particularly new for me content wise but so thrilling to see how many people from all over the world are looking into this wanting to understand more!

The other course is through the Civic Ecology Lab, Cornell University. It has been wonderful to really study again. To reflect on lectures and webinars, to keep up with the readings and fill a notebook with ideas and reflections.

And here, again, unexpectedly finding a tribe – a group of humans literally all over the planet on a similar quest for knowledge and the tools to share their message and their passion for Mother Earth.

So, right now I’m taking the advice from my previous post to “Educate yourself for the coming conflicts” Mother Jones.

Learning is a life-long journey that is for sure.

Hope your 2020 has started on a positive note too.

Ubuntu

A Zulu proverb referencing our humanity and connection to others

I have always loved this word – Ubuntu – the philosophy and the worldview behind it.

Here is a little reflection one month out from my upcoming African adventure.

I am not sure of a lot of things but one thing I am definitely sure of is that we are all connected. We impact each other every day for good or ill.

What I find particularly profound about Ubuntu is there is still room for individuality within this human story. To me this means that my actions count. Who I am and what I do makes a difference and is significant in the greater scheme of things. How empowering! This gives me hope in the face of all the tragedy and heart ache I see every day.

Taking this idea one step further I like to think of “we” as all the other living beings we share the planet with. I believe we are connected also. And while some groups of humans have not figured this out yet, I can be a voice for the voiceless. That tends to be what gets me out of bed in the morning, heading to work to teach conservation education to the next generation. A very urbanised, disconnected next generation.

And so I have been led to connect with people like Carla Geyser, founder of the Blue Sky Society Trust and organiser of the Journey with Purpose expedition I am embarking on in a month’s time. Here is woman who by her actions and what she has chosen to do believes in the power of Ubuntu. Definitely a kindred spirit!

Due to the ongoing effects of Cyclone Idai in Mozambique, our itinerary has had to change. We will head further south. The original collaring project in Gile National Reserve will hopefully go ahead later in the year.

I also follow Dr Michelle Henley on social media through the work she does with Elephants Alive. Here is another individual dedicated to wildlife conservation but not leaving humanity out of the picture.

Obviously much of the focus in my news feed will be about my beloved corner of Mama Africa and the amazing individuals dedicating their lives to helping wildlife as well as communities of humans in this part of the world.

But I also work with passionate conservationists everyday. Check out this link to an amazing wildlife experience in Sumatra. The incredible woman who put this together is also a wife, mom, team leader, field conservationist and all round inspirational human being!

And I could go on and on with examples of humans who work everyday on the assumption of Ubuntu… our individual actions bringing us together, uniting us in our efforts to make the world a better place.

What I love about this is that conservation of wildlife and wild places can no longer be seen to separate humanity from the picture. We have to take this journey together, learn to live in harmony not just with each other but with all the species we share the planet with. It is a huge responsibility and we cannot see the kindness and compassion it takes as a weakness.

I will finish off with a mention that the fundraising efforts continue, even though the itinerary has changed. And again, I do know that we are all saturated with requests for money for a million different good causes… but maybe this one speaks to you? A bit of Ubuntu